Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A party that favors peace or the making of peace.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Democratic peace-party candidates lacerated him as a war surrogate.

    Patt Morrison: ''What Ifs'' About the Bagram Bomber and A Post-Cheney VP

  • Phliasian named Delphion, a real hero, it would seem, took to himself three hundred Phliasians, and not only succeeded in preventing the peace-party from carrying out their wishes, but was equal to the task of incarcerating and keeping safely under lock and key those whom he mistrusted.

    Hellenica

  • The latter result was largely due to the position of the Athenian general and statesman Pho'cion -- the last Athenian in whom these two functions were united -- who generally acted with the peace-party.

    Mosaics of Grecian History

  • For the time being, a peace-party had ceased to exist.

    England under the Tudors

  • There was, meanwhile, a strong peace-party which earnestly deprecated all agitation of the subject, maintained that the sentiments of the French Emperor and the French nation were most friendly to England, and contended that to incur largely increased expenses for additional war-preparations was unnecessary, impolitic, and ruinously extravagant.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 70, August, 1863

  • Nor was the House more impressed by Mr. TREVELYAN'S proposal that as there might be a peace-party in Germany it was our duty to "state our full terms and find out."

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, March 1, 1916

  • If Leopold had hoped to intimidate France or to strengthen the peace-party at Paris, he made the greatest mistake of his reign.

    William Pitt and the Great War

  • The discussion was carried to the Emperor's presence; the peace-party prevailed, and Saigo with three other Cabinet ministers resigned.

    A History of the Japanese People From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era

  • But, as things stand, I see how desperately hard it is to bring the peace-party and the war-party together, and I believe that the difficulty is due to certain deficiencies in the program of pacificism which set the militarist imagination strongly, and to a certain extent justifiably, against it.

    Memories and Studies

  • A Phliasian named Delphion, a real hero, it would seem, took to himself three hundred Phliasians, and not only succeeded in preventing the peace-party from carrying out their wishes, but was equal to the task of incarcerating and keeping safely under lock and key those whom he mistrusted.

    Hellenica

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