person-environment love

person-environment

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Psychoneuroendocrine approaches to the study of stressful person-environment transactions.

    Handbook of Stress

  • This last principle applies to both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping; the former alters the objective features of the person-environment relationship; the latter alters how that reality is evaluated with respect to its significance for personal well-being.

    Handbook of Stress

  • The person-environment relationships leading to the emotions are always changing, just like emotions, which are usually context-dependent and therefore continually in flux.

    Handbook of Stress

  • Relational refers to the metatheoretical assumption that emotions are always about person-environment relationships, not about environmental demands or intrapsychic needs and processes as such.

    Handbook of Stress

  • A concept denoting the opposite of stress would enrich our way of looking at person-environment interactions.

    Handbook of Stress

  • Emotions are, in effect, cognitive-motivational-relational configurations whose status changes with changes in the person-environment relationship, as understood and evaluated appraised by the individual experiencing them.

    Handbook of Stress

  • Coping that serves problem solving results in changes in the person-environment relationship through direct actions on the environment or through changing our own part in that relationship.

    Handbook of Stress

  • The best way to portray the heart of the theory is to convert cognition, motivation, and person-environment relationships into personal meanings, which I refer to as core relational themes and patterns of appraisal see Horowitz, 1989, and Lazarus, 1991c, for a discussion of other, similar uses of this term by Luborsky, 1984.

    Handbook of Stress

  • In the other basic process, efforts are mounted to change the personal meaning of the person-environment relationship that has resulted in distressing emotions such as anger, anxiety, guilt, shame, envy, jealousy, and disgust.

    Handbook of Stress

  • Another reason for changes in person-environment relationships is that when encounters are harmful or threatening, coping processes are set in motion, that, if successful, eliminate or ameliorate the harmful condition along with the emotion it produced.

    Handbook of Stress

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