Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of pineapple.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As on the first Monday, so on the second - pageantry, music and breathtaking beauty, enlivened by the scrabbling to catch one of the pineapples from the Papaloapan, a sombrero de palma from the Mixteca, mezcal from Ejutla or any of the varied products of their region thrown by members of each delegation into the audience.

    Guelaguetza

  • The heart of the plant, called pineapples (piñas), are first smoked in an oven and mashed (tepache) to extract the liquid.

    Archive 2008-01-01

  • Vanille-Pineapple smells not so much like fresh pineapples as it portrays the idea of pineapples as we know it through the flavoring industry.

    Archive 2006-09-01

  • The European Union has granted favorable tariff rates to many developing countries in the past decade, especially for fruit and vegetables it doesn't grow, such as pineapples, mangoes and passion fruit.

    Flight Ban Takes Toll on Some Sectors

  • In some communities, whole fruits such as pineapples are considered exotic because they are so hard to find.

    Mari Gallagher: Fast, Cheap and Easy: How Fringe Food Hurts Public Health When it's the Only Choice

  • For lighter desserts, locals turn to tropical fruits such as pineapples, guava and mamey for flans, timbales, and pudding-like sweets.

    A culinary tour of Xalapa: Dining in the home of Jalapeños

  • They always referred to 'pineapples' in Italian as 'pineapples', never as 'ananas' in the proper Italian way.

    languagehat.com: WHEN FRENCH PREFERS ENGLISH.

  • After several years of lagging performance, the Ivorian economy began a comeback in 1994, due to improved prices for cocoa and coffee, growth in non-traditional primary exports such as pineapples and rubber, trade and banking liberalization, offshore oil and gas discoveries, and generous external financing and debt rescheduling by multilateral lenders and

    The 1995 CIA World Factbook

  • CFA franc and improved prices for cocoa and coffee, growth in nontraditional primary exports such as pineapples and rubber, limited trade and banking liberalization, offshore oil and gas discoveries, and generous external financing and debt rescheduling by multilateral lenders and France.

    The 2005 CIA World Factbook

  • After several years of lagging performance, the Ivorian economy began a comeback in 1994, due to the 50\% devaluation of the CFA franc and improved prices for cocoa and coffee, growth in nontraditional primary exports such as pineapples and rubber, limited trade and banking liberalization, offshore oil and gas discoveries, and generous external financing and debt rescheduling by multilateral lenders and France.

    The 2005 CIA World Factbook

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