Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The exterior wheel of the sun-and-planet motion (see sun).
  • n. In the plural, an epicyclic train of mechanism for roducing a variable : angular motion, such as that of the radius vector of a planet in its orbit.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In some cases, particularly when annular wheels are used, the train-arm may become very short, so that it may be impossible to mount the planet-wheel in the manner thus far represented, upon a pin carried by a crank.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • The action of a complete epicyclic train involves virtually and always the action of two suns and two planets; but it has already been shown that the two planets may merge into one piece, as in Fig. 10, where the planet-wheel gears externally with one sun-wheel, and internally with the other.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • But in attempting to apply this formula in analyzing the action of an incomplete train, we are required to add this motion of the train-arm, not only to that of a sun-wheel, but to that of a planet-wheel.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 441, June 14, 1884.

  • This consists of a fixed sun-wheel A, engaging with a planet-wheel B of the same diameter.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 441, June 14, 1884.

  • Thus the formula leads to the surprising conclusion, that when A is fixed and T revolves, the planet-wheel B will revolve about its axis twice as fast as T moves, in one case, while in the other it will not revolve at all.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 441, June 14, 1884.

  • Now it happens that the only examples given by Prof. Willis of incomplete trains in which the axis of a planet-wheel whose motion is to be determined is not parallel to the central axis of the system, are similar to the one just discussed; the wheel in question being carried by a secondary train-arm which derives its motion from a wheel of the primary train.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 441, June 14, 1884.

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