Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A poetaster; a bad poet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A poetaster.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A petty poet; a poetaster. 288

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • QUOTATION: The more congenial page of some tenth-rate poeticule worn out with failure after failure and now squat in his hole like the tailless fox, he is curled up to snarl and whimper beneath the inaccessible vine of song.

    Quotations

  • Prefaces; and it is well to remember the witticism of Voltaire, who, on hearing an ambitious poeticule read his Ode to Posterity, doubted whether it would reach its address.

    Prisoner for Blasphemy

  • Incredible as it may seem to readers of the historian, the poeticule has actually contrived so far to transfigure by dint of disfiguring him that this most noble and pathetic scene in all the annals of chivalry, when passed through the alembic of his incompetence, appears in a garb of transforming verse under a guise at once weak and wordy, coarse and unchivalrous.

    A Study of Shakespeare

  • The very oversight perceptible to any eye and painful to any ear not sealed up by stepdame nature from all perception of pleasure or of pain derivable from good verse or bad -- the reckless reiteration of the same rhyme with but one poor couplet intervening -- suggests rather the oversight of an unfledged poet than the obtuseness of a full-grown poeticule or poetaster.

    A Study of Shakespeare

  • After this dismissal of the two nobles, the pimping poeticule, Villon manque or (whom shall we call him?) reussi, reappears with a message to

    A Study of Shakespeare

  • ‘The poeticule surmises, the sun sets and rises, within his world navel asshole.’

    McClellan’s Book Bubble Bursts on the Blogs - The Lede Blog - NYTimes.com

  • 7887The more congenial page of some tenth-rate poeticule worn out with failure after failure and now squat in his hole like the tailless fox, he is curled up to snarl and whimper beneath the inaccessible vine of song.

    Quotations

  • 35The more congenial page of some tenth-rate poeticule worn out with failure after failure and now squat in his hole like the tailless fox, he is curled up to snarl and whimper beneath the inaccessible vine of song.

    Quotations

  • a careful ear may catch some far faint echo even yet; the fearful and furtive yelp from beneath of the masked and writhing poeticule, the shrill reverberation all around it of plagiarism and parody.

    A Study of Shakespeare

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