Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A unit of force equal to a mass of one avoirdupois pound times a standard acceleration of gravity, equal to about 4.44822 newtons. Symbol lbf or lbf.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The simulator is capable of attaining pressures of 30,000 psig (pound-force per square inch gauge) at a rated temperature of 500 degrees Farenheit.

    National Business News - Local Business News | bizjournals

  • On Monday, not only did I lecture on the difference between weight and mass, but I did the whole spiel on the relation between pound-force (lbf), pound-mass (lbm), and slug (this is an engineering class, after all).

    Wired Campus

  • Yes, pound-force (the standard pound that your bathroom scale measures) is a force unit because gravity has been taken into account.

    Wired Campus

  • So under common conditions, a pound-mass weighs a pound-force, but when one is out of earth's gravity that equivalence fails.

    Wired Campus

  • The slug is the mass that gives rise to a pound-force under an acceleration of 1 ft/s/s.

    Wired Campus

  • During the tests at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, a 25 pound-force thruster testbed successfully demonstrated cooling with gaseous methane and gaseous oxygen, as well as rapid start and stop at simulated altitude conditions.

    StreetInsider.com News Articles

  • The company's TR408 second-generation, oxygen-methane 100 pound-force reaction control engine (RCE) was designed for the Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development Project within NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program, and features robust operation over widely variable propellant conditions.

    News

  • The material used was 9 / 16 "Blue Water climb-spec webbing with a manufacturer rating of 2300 pound-force; all cut from the same pair of 50 foot lengths of webbing (one red and one blue).

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