prisoner-of-war love

prisoner-of-war

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Attributive form of prisoner of war, noun.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The heavy cruiser was sunk off Java on February 28, 1942, and Schwarz spent more than three years in Japanese prisoner-of-war camps.

    The Things They Buried

  • Yoo, a former law professor and clerk to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, concluded that neither the Taliban nor al-Qaeda were entitled to prisoner-of-war status, or the protections of the Geneva Convention.

    The Longest War

  • Terrorists fight out of uniform and target civilians and thus do not deserve traditional prisoner-of-war protections.

    Obama Ratifies Bush

  • My reaction was outrage, fuelled by the fact the prisoner-of-war experience bruised our family for decades.

    ARTHUR REX CRANE

  • In February, military historian and author Lynette Silver took her seat at an official service at Ballarat's prisoner-of-war memorial.

    ARTHUR REX CRANE

  • Silver, military historian and author, took her seat at an official service at Ballarat's prisoner-of-war memorial.

    ARTHUR REX CRANE

  • After the picture appeared, however, the newspaper received calls and e-mails from several people questioning Bump's prisoner-of-war status.

    Ronald E Bump

  • Mr. Demjanjuk's lawyer insists he was in a prisoner-of-war camp throughout the war, a claim Mr. Nestler, the victims' lawyer, calls "his lifelong lie."

    Demjanjuk Trial Gets Bogged Down

  • The Green Mountain Boys' leader was a rash commander and the author of a popular prisoner-of-war memoir.

    Founding Father (Of Vermont)

  • None of Dearden's films can really be called classics—though his 1946 prisoner-of-war melodrama "The Captive Heart" is awfully good.

    Lessons Without Lectures

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