Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of a class of simple proteins having a high proline content and found in the seeds of wheat, rye, maize, and barley.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. any of a class of proteins, high in proline, found in the seeds of cereals

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a simple protein found in plants

Etymologies

prol(ine) + am(monia) + -ine2.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • In patients with gluten intolerance, the body reacts negatively to the prolamine.

    Ashley Koff: The Gluten-Free Challenge

  • Each grain has a different prolamine: wheat (gliadin), barley (hordein), rye (secalin) and oats (avenin).

    Ashley Koff: The Gluten-Free Challenge

  • Gluten is broken up into two smaller categories of proteins: the prolamine (e.g., gliadin) and the dietary protein (e.g., glutenin).

    Ashley Koff: The Gluten-Free Challenge

  • Of the different protein types, prolamine constitutes 40 percent and globulins

    4. Pearl Millet

  • Even bodies desperately in need of more muscle, enzymes, blood, and brain continue passing prolamine that might otherwise provide the necessary amino acids.

    7. Sorghum

  • In the long term, sorghums that have less prolamine may come available for routine use.

    7. Sorghum

  • In fact, prolamine makes up about 59 percent of the total protein in normal sorghum.

    7. Sorghum

  • A large proportion of the protein is prolamine, an alcohol-soluble protein that has low digestibility in humans.

    7. Sorghum

  • A large proportion of it is prolamine, a cross-linked form that humans cannot easily digest.

    7. Sorghum

  • At the heart of the issue of sorghum's nutritive effectiveness is the above-mentioned fact that almost 60 percent of the protein is in the highly cross-linked form called prolamine.

    7. Sorghum

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