quiet-coloured love

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Father Brown was puzzled first by little labyrinths of flowerless flower-pots, covered with the low, flat, quiet-coloured plants that look less like a garden than a tessellated pavement, between weak curly paths studded with seats with curly backs.

    The Complete Father Brown

  • This is twilight: the "quiet-coloured eve" smiles as it leaves the "many-tinkling fleece"; all is tranquillity, the slopes and rills melt into one grey ... and he knows

    Browning's Heroines

  • His clothes were always loose and easy-fitting, and generally of some quiet-coloured cloth or tweed.

    Alfred Russel Wallace Letters and Reminiscences

  • Brown was puzzled first by little labyrinths of flowerless flower-pots, covered with the low, flat, quiet-coloured plants that look less like

    The Wisdom of Father Brown

  • He did not believe in mourning, as he had told his uncle on his last visit; and though he usually went in for quiet-coloured ties, he wore this evening one of an ugly red, in order to shock Morton the butler, and to make them thrash out the whole question of mourning for themselves in the servants 'hall.

    Masterpieces of Mystery, Vol. 1 (of 4) Ghost Stories

  • He neither swears nor preaches, but weaves about his reader a subtle film of thought, through whose gossamer all things seem to suffer a curious change, and to become harmonious and suggestive, as dark and quiet-coloured things often are.

    Among Famous Books

  • For the rest he was clad in a quiet-coloured robe and cap, and to all appearance unarmed.

    Pearl-Maiden

  • The quiet-coloured end of evening smiled fainter, fainter.

    My Friend Prospero

  • Then the last look of the sun, the creeping shadows that made the sea gray and turned the little lake to an inky hue, and then the slow fall of the quiet-coloured evening, and, last, the fall of the mystic night!

    The Ethics of Drink and Other Social Questions Joints In Our Social Armour

  • Her dress was elegant, but peculiarly plain and simple, -- a close white silk bonnet and gauze veil; a quiet-coloured silk gown, with less of flourish and frill, by half, than any other person; a delicate little hand which, when ungloved, displayed some handsome rings; a jewelled watch, of peculiar splendour; and a countenance expressive of anxious thoughtfulness -- must be remembered by many who were at Baden in August, 1833.

    The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims, In All Times and Countries, especially in England and in France

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