Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A court or area in which the game of rackets is played; a tennis-court.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Of the cricket-ground or racket-court I was allowed to know nothing.

    Autobiography of Anthony Trollope

  • At the back of this quadrangle was another long low building, in the same picturesque style as the rest, which, Mrs. Gray explained, contained on one side a charming little theatre which could also be used as a ball-room, and on the other an admirable bowling-alley and racket-court for the use of the members.

    A Little Country Girl

  • Let us come and hear -- for we have put on our cap of darkness and are invisible, coming and going where we like, unobserved -- what our four fast friends at the racket-court are talking about.

    St. Winifred's, or The World of School

  • Along the northwestern side were a number of yards and buildings, the racket-court, the sheep-pens, the slaughter-house, the cattle-yard, a storehouse for the food for the cattle, and a guardhouse; and behind them stood a strong building known as Ommaney's house, guarded by a deep ditch and cactus hedge, and defended with two pieces of artillery.

    In Times of Peril

  • He had a racket in a racket-court at St. John's Wood Road, and as soon as fortune and merit increased his salary by another £100 a year, he usually had a nag for the season.

    The Three Clerks

  • We had several lecture-rooms besides; and then the large old courtyard served as a capital playground in wet weather, as well as a racket-court; and in one corner of it we had our gymnasium, which was one of the many capital things belonging to the school.

    Ernest Bracebridge School Days

  • The area formed by the wall in that part of the Fleet in which Mr. Pickwick stood was just wide enough to make a good racket-court; one side being formed, of course, by the wall itself, and the other by that portion of the prison which looked (or rather would have looked, but for the wall) towards St. Paul's Cathedral.

    The Pickwick papers

  • Several contemporary writers, as well as general tradition, state that, on occasion of one of the various embassies sent to and fro between the courts of London and Paris, the Dauphin, then about eighteen or nineteen years of age, sent an insulting present (p. 109) to Henry of a tun of tennis-balls, with a message full of contempt and scorn, [84] implying that a racket-court was a more fit place for him than a battle-field.

    Henry of Monmouth, Volume 2 Memoirs of Henry the Fifth

  • He had a racket in a racket-court at St. John’s Wood Road, and as soon as fortune and merit increased his salary by another �0 a year, he usually had a nag for the season.

    The Three Clerks

  • I was asking him, and he said in his lazy way that they had got a decent racket-court at his place, and that he had been knocking the balls about a bit since he came home. "

    The Dash for Khartoum A Tale of Nile Expedition

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