Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having only real values: having as its codomain the set of real numbers or a subset thereof.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There are many examples in the literature defining a vector (vector field) as a triple of real numbers (real-valued functions) which transform in a certain way under certain coordinate changes.

    Bad Language: Metric vs Metric Tensor vs Matrix Form vs Line Element

  • As I said above, gij is not the metric tensor, or a tensor at all, but a set of real-valued function specified for a local coordinate system (gij are also the matrix elements in the matrix representation – in those coordinates – of the metric tensor).

    Bad Language: Metric vs Metric Tensor vs Matrix Form vs Line Element

  • The sketchiness of an individual is measured, like the skewness of any given real-valued variable, by the combination of several dimensions of behavior.

    Jane Pak: Pak's Co-Efficient of Sketchiness

  • The sketchiness of an individual is measured, like the skewness of any given real-valued variable, by the combination of several dimensions of behavior -- communication based on technicality, obfuscation, ambiguity, tonality, diversion, digression, and ratio of chocolate chips to dough.

    Jane Pak: Pak's Co-Efficient of Sketchiness

  • The values of a bivalent quantity, for instance, form a set with two members; the values of a real-valued quantity form a set with the structure of the real numbers.

    Quantum Mechanics

  • We can also represent simple real-valued random variables operator-theoretically.

    Puppet X: 1

  • In fact, these are only the special cases of real-valued plausibility measures.

    Formal Representations of Belief

  • And so on for all of the infinitely many equivalent reformulations of the problem (in terms of the fourth, fifth, ¦ power of the length, and indeed in terms of every non-zero real-valued exponent of the length).

    Interpretations of Probability

  • There is a formal analogy between classical and quantum fields: field values are attached to space-time points where these values are real-valued in the case of classical fields and operator-valued in the case of quantum fields.

    Quantum Field Theory

  • The notion of arbitrary set grew in the late 19th century from developments in analysis, somewhat in the way that the concept of arbitrary real-valued function had grown earlier in the century.

    Quine's New Foundations

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