Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To replace old wallpaper with new wallpaper, usually on walls, either by first stripping the old wallpaper off, or papering over the top.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • First of all, let me assure you that I truly understand your whole knob issue; it is for this reason that I don't repaper the upstairs bathroom, even though the old paper is beginning to peel in the corners.

    the knob theory of the universe

  • Basically, when I finally do repaper, it will involve painting and re-doing the entire upstairs of the house, and I will lose a whole summer of writing time.

    the knob theory of the universe

  • It's hard to repaper your thinking when the pols manage to provide us with so much comedy relief in the midst of all their bone-headed moves while serious matters go unattended.

    Sen. Graig Provides Laughs and Insights for the "Put the Seat Down" Crowd

  • Did you, like myself, first get enough rejection letters to repaper your walls?

    My First Sale by Nora Roberts

  • When the wallpaper is dirty and vacuuming or dusting does not help, you must either clean the wallpaper or repaper the wall.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • “The only way you could eradicate most of the blood would be to repaint everything, repaper the walls, refinish the floors, and pitch the furniture,” Vander said.

    CRUEL AND UNUSUAL

  • After this with a well-moistened cloth to the nose, rush in and throw the windows open, hurry out and allow the room to air from twelve to twenty-four hours, after which wash woodwork and painted walls or take paper off and repaper walls; recalcimine ceilings and closets; scrub closet shelves and dresser drawers, bedsteads, and other furniture thoroughly.

    The Mother and Her Child

  • "We must repaper -- that's sure; plain green, with a little touch of color in the border, and, oh, Mother Shaw, wouldn't a green and white matting be lovely?"

    The S. W. F. Club

  • She believes with John Masefield that "the days that make us happy make us wise" and surely spring, filling us with irrational joy, is the time for resolutions: at the first glimpse of bursting buds we resolve to "write a poem, paint a picture, compose a symphony, found a business, plant a tree, build a summer-house, and repaper the dining-room".

    Try Anything Twice

  • A decorator was called in to repaper the bathroom and kitchenette, but for the living-room Grant engaged a carpenter.

    Dennison Grant: a Novel of To-day

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