Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A mask used by ladies to protect the face in riding.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A skirt, or upper-petticoat of camlet, like those worn by country ladies of moderate rank when on horseback, with such a riding-mask as they frequently use on journeys to preserve their eyes and complexion from the sun and dust, and sometimes, it is suspected, to enable then to play off a little coquetry.

    Redgauntlet

  • “Why, I thought you had never seen the wench but once, and then she had her riding-mask on; I am sure you told me so.”

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • Peniston put on her linen riding-mask, and in a moment was seated behind me.

    Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker

  • Then Darthea slyly put on her riding-mask, and we went in.

    Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker

  • -- A skirt, or upper-petticoat of camlet, like those worn by country ladies of moderate rank when on horseback, with such a riding-mask as they frequently use on journeys to preserve their eyes and complexion from the sun and dust, and sometimes, it is suspected, to enable then to play off a little coquetry.

    Redgauntlet

  • He was not so bewildered in his own hurried reflections but that he remarked, that the deadly paleness which had occupied her neck and temples, and such of her features as the riding-mask left exposed, gave place to a deep and rosy suffusion; and he felt with embarrassment that a flush was by tacit sympathy excited in his own cheeks.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • She wore a black silk riding-mask, which was then a common fashion, as well for preserving the complexion from the sun and rain, as from an idea of decorum, which did not permit a lady to appear barefaced while engaged in a boisterous sport, and attended by a promiscuous company.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • "Why, I thought you had never seen the wench but once, and then she had her riding-mask on; I am sure you told me so."

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • "Let me recommend to you a vizard with silver buttons to hold in the mouth, or, better, a riding-mask," cried Aunt Gainor, pleased at this gentle badgering, "like this, John.

    Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker

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