Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as reaver.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Grendel this monster grim was called, march-riever 7 mighty, in moorland living, in fen and fastness; fief of the giants the hapless wight a while had kept since the Creator his exile doomed.

    Beowulf, translated by Francis Gummere

  • "Thought you would riever get the hint," Sampson said as he stretched his wide body across both seats.

    Cat & Mouse

  • Once that pole had lifted a banner of ragged black marsh-flopper skin bearing the device of the Kragan riever-chieftain whose family had built the castle; now it carried a neat rectangle of blue bunting emblazoned with the wreathed globe of the Terran

    Uller Uprising

  • As well might the border farmer have engraved his name and address on the collars of his grazing herds, in the hope that the riever would respect this symbol of authority.

    Americans and Others

  • Grendel this monster grim was called, march-riever {1e} mighty, in moorland living, in fen and fastness; fief of the giants the hapless wight a while had kept since the Creator his exile doomed.

    Beowulf

  • "It shall never be said, whilst I am bailiff of Southampton, that any waster, riever, draw-latch or murtherer came scathless away from me and my posse.

    The White Company

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