Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. belonging to or characteristic of Romanticism or the Romantic Movement in the arts

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I am never so enamoured of a cause that I will not admit facts that seem to tell against it, and I will allow that this writer of romanticistic short stories has more than any other supplied us with memorable types and characters.

    Some Anomalies of the Short Story (from Literature and Life)

  • It serves equally the ideal and the real; that which it is loath to serve is the unreal, so that among the short stories which have recently made reputations for their authors very few are of that peculiar cast which we have no name for but romanticistic.

    Some Anomalies of the Short Story (from Literature and Life)

  • At heart Clemens was romantic, and he would have had the world of fiction stately and handsome and whatever the real world was not; but he was not romanticistic, and he was too helplessly an artist not to wish his own work to show life as he had seen it.

    My Mark Twain (from Literary Friends and Acquaintance)

  • The only distinguished modern writer of romanticistic novelle whom I can think of is Mr. Bret Harte, and he is of a period when romanticism was so imperative as to be almost a condition of fiction.

    Some Anomalies of the Short Story (from Literature and Life)

  • Balzac, when he imagined these monsters, was not Balzac, he was Dumas; he was not realistic, he was romanticistic.

    Criticism and Fiction

  • It must be as hard to think up anything new in that kind as in romanticistic fiction, which circus-acting otherwise largely resembles.

    Short Stories and Essays (from Literature and Life)

  • It was romantic as Shakespeare himself was romantic, in an elder sense of the word, and not romanticistic as Dumas was romanticistic.

    Literature and Life (Complete)

  • Whether this figure is the fancy of the sorrowing husband or the caprice of the defunct herself, who wished to be shown to after-time as she hoped she looked in the past, I do not know; but I had the same difficulty with it as I had with that father and son; it was romanticistic.

    Roman Holidays, and Others

  • But here the fact wanted the basis of simplicity so strong in the other scene; in the mixture of the real and the ideal the group was romanticistic.

    Roman Holidays, and Others

  • He preached a crusade against romanticism, and fought a long fight with it, only to realize at last that he was himself too romanticistic to succeed against it, and heroically to own his defeat.

    Emile Zola

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