Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Decorative work imitating the twisted or spiral form of cordage.
  • n. A netting or fringe made of strands of manila rope or cotton cords.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It requires crawling, climbing, rope-work, technical rope-work and many other complex human motions in order to access these.

    Penelope Boston says there might be life on Mars

  • As the garrison had an opportunity for maintaining a fire right on the heads of their assailants, the besiegers contrived hanging roofs of strong rope-work netting, laid over with a thick covering of raw hides.

    The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. From George III. to Victoria

  • A little rope-work, sail-making, and experience with storms and such things, and by the end of the voyage you could ship on any coasting schooner.

    Chapter 16

  • Buck sat down, and Ward did a little more rope-work.

    The Ranch at the Wolverine

  • They were all ornamented, some of them very elaborately, with spiral and rope-work patterns; one of them, found, not in a magazine, but in a small room near the Central Court, was particularly elaborate in its adornment, and stood almost five feet in height

    The Sea-Kings of Crete

  • Examples are shown of geometrical designs, of floriated ornament, of which the conventional vine pattern is the most frequent, and of rope-work and other interlacing ornament.

    Vanishing England

  • What ingenuity in the thick rope-work which is woven before the guns, leaving only a little hole through which the man laying the gun can take his aim, and which is thoroughly impervious to rifle shot!

    Journal Kept During The Russian War: From The Departure Of The Army From England In April 1854, To The Fall Of Sebastopol

  • The roof was composed of a strong rope-work netting, laid over with a thick covering of wet hides, while its sloping position was calculated to prevent shells from lodging, and to throw them off into the sea before they could burst.

    How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves Updated to 1900

  • But here the, Baronet and Mr. Oldbuck having recovered their wind, and continued their respective harangues, the three strands of the conversation, to speak the language of a rope-work, were again twined together into one undistinguishable string of confusion.

    The Antiquary

  • But here the Baronet and Mr. Oldbuck having recovered their wind, and continued their respective harangues, the three _strands_ of the conversation, to speak the language of a rope-work, were again twined together into one undistinguishable string of confusion.

    The Antiquary — Complete

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