Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bar of sand formed in the bottom or at the mouth of a river.
  • n. A bar of sand formed in the bottom or at the mouth of a river.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A drowned man lay on his back on the sand-bar, staring upward, unblinking, at the sun.

    CHAPTER 3

  • Inside the mouth of the river, after the sand-bar had combed the strength of the breakers, he built a big fish-trap.

    THE STRENGTH OF THE STRONG

  • The horse had to swim out to a sand-bar first and got stuck there because the current got so much stronger so quickly he wouldn't budge.

    Peeg and Brie (opening of a teen novel)

  • So I dragged my heel from the water's edge over the sand-bar to the beach, making a thin scritch of a line.

    A Line Drawn in the Sand

  • The tiller had been abandoned, and Chateaubriand describes an American passenger, 'one of those men thrown up in the course of events, one of those spontaneous children of peril', take the helm and gauge the waves at the stern to select one to take them over a sand-bar into deeper water, or wreck them.

    [oceanos] cowardice and courage

  • Long fingers of beach and sand-bar islands appear and disappear along with the shifting tides.

    Chatham, Mass.

  • There is a narrow sand-bar running into it, with very deep water on one side, on which I helped boil a kettle of chowder, some six rods from the main shore, about the year 1824, which it has not been possible to do for twenty-five years; and, on the other hand, my friends used to listen with incredulity when I told them, that a few years later

    Walden

  • We looked too and on a sand-bar near the shore we saw three gendarmes standing with a group of civilians.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

  • Huck and Nigger Jim; then, when they had frolicked on the sand-bar at the head of the island for an hour or more, they would swim back in the dusk, a distance of half a mile, breasting the strong, steady Mississippi current without exhaustion or fear.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • Dredging the sand-bar and cutting a passage in the soft coralline reef will give excellent shelter and, some say, a depth of seventeen fathoms.

    The Land of Midian

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