Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A remedy made from healthy living tissue.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A name applied by Dujardin in 1835 to the gelatinous material forming the bodies of the lowest animals; protoplasm.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Dujardin's name of the primitive indifferent substance of all animal bodies, as observed by him in certain protozoans: subsequently named and now usually called protoplasm or bioplasm.
  • Sarcodic or sarcodous; protoplasmic.

Etymologies

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Amoeba Princeps, a minute particle of jelly-like substance, called sarcode -- scarcely larger than a small grain of sand -- and with no distinction of organs or limbs.

    Story of Creation as Told By Theology and By Science

  • At the point of union (to facilitate which there is a hiatus in the margins of the peduncle) the sarcode or “flesh” of the coral is denuded, its place being occupied by ligaments, which by minute ramifications adhere so intimately to the coral stock or stem that severance therefrom cannot be effected without loss of life to the mollusc.

    My Tropic Isle

  • Meanwhile, the diffluence causes a spreading and flattening of the sarcode and swimming gives place to creeping, while the flagella violently lash.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • Then followed an amoeboid and uncertain form, with an increased intensity of action which lasted a few moments, when lassitude supervened, then perfect stillness of the body, which is now globular in form, while the flagellum feebly lashed, and then fell upon and fused with the substance of the sarcode.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • In the course of a few seconds there is no disconnected sarcode visible, and in five to seven minutes the organism is

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • The flagellum of the smaller one at length moved slower, then sluggishly, then fell upon the sarcode, which rapidly diminished, while the bigger form expanded and became vividly active until the two bodies had actually fused into one.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • Now the sarcode was, as it were, kneading its own substance, and again an inner whirling motion was visible, reminding one of the rush of water round the interior of a hollow sphere on its way to a jet or fountain.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • At the same moment a motion is set up which pulls the divided pairs asunder, making the interval of sarcode to grow constantly greater between them.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • In the perfectly motionless flattened sphere, without the shimmer of premonition and with inconceivable suddenness, a white cross smites itself, as it were, through the sarcode.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

  • This condition tensified, the amoeboid action quickened as here depicted, the agility of motion ceased, the nucleus body became strongly developed, and the whole sarcode was in a state of vivid and glittering action.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 470, January 3, 1885

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