Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Sarsaparilla.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Sarsaparilla.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • MM, the first time i brought home Lechong Cebu to my Northern-bred mom and tita, they loudly complained that I forgot the "sarsa".

    Market Manila

  • He was, as he had wished to be, at the center of the media world for a time, but was soon superceded when the news went out that Purity, the sarsa-flower slave at the Prudent Greenhouse, had finally wasted away to nothing and died.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • She was wrapped around a stalk of the sarsa flower, its lower leaves draped lovingly over her dark skin.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • Purity had traveled here from the Breeder Planet, as had the sarsa-flower.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • She would be on display the whole time, like the sarsa-flower-slave.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • Sade ogled the bloom slave, bound to the sarsa plant by long, white tendrils.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • The restaurant had a sarsa flower with its own bloom slave as the centerpiece of the garden, which was in turn the central fixture of the restaurant's main dining room.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • Figg liked the restaurant but feared it was becoming outre, the result of a fame mostly due to the fragile beauty of the sarsa slave, whose name was Purity.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • The Breeders had created the symbiosis in the first place; the sarsa fed on its human slave in such a way that it numbed the slave to any idea of any other life.

    Asimov's Science Fiction

  • A decoction of the twigs of that tree cured the gardener, as he assured us, of an obstinate pain in both shoulders that no other medicine would touch; which testimony in its favour made us look with an added interest on the cordate leaf, and small white verbena-looking flower, of certainly the first, and in all probability the last, _Smilax sarsa_ we should ever see _growing_.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

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