Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of satisfice.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He engaged in satisficing (taking the first information available, a behaviour also alluded to by Meyers in his study of grade 9s), trusted the search engine, and took the first two results; he did not plan, nor did he revisit the assignment.

    2008 IASL Conference -2

  • Excerpt: In economics, satisficing is a behaviour which attempts to achieve at least some minimum level of a particular variable, but which does not strive to achieve its maximum possible value.

    Has It Been a Week Already?

  • This position is often described as satisficing consequentialism (Slote 1984).

    Consequentialism

  • Consumers willingly take these risks in satisficing.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • Avoiding Endless Occupation yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'Avoiding Endless Occupation'; yahooBuzzArticleSummary = 'Article: A compromise course is proposed for Iraq that would reduce casualties and maybe expense while "satisficing" all conflicting power interests there.'

    Avoiding Endless Occupation

  • What you're doing there is 'satisficing' rather than 'optimising'.

    Mind Hacks: when choice is demotivating

  • And, your phrasing above almost suggests that you are talking about the emergence of norms (and essentially about 'satisficing' related to coordination), but I'm not sure that we then necessarily need performativity.

    orgtheory.net

  • An economist would say these consumers were satisficing (looking for advice that is good enough).

    Superhero Nation: how to write superhero novels and comic books » Thanks, Evil Editor!

  • Instructional manipulation checks: Detecting satisficing to increase statistical power Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 867-872

    Archive 2010-07-01

  • Strong factors in their use and trust of information sources were motivation and satisficing (finding information that is “good enough” or adequate, but not necessarily optimal, for the task; the term is attributable to Herbert Simon).

    2008 IASL Conference -2

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