Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Small, thinly sliced pieces of meat, especially veal, dredged in flour, sautéed, and served in a sauce.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A thin scallop of veal (sometimes other meat) dredged in flour and then sautéed

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Italian, pl. of scaloppina, diminutive of scaloppa, thin slice, from French escalope, from Old French, shell (from the fillets being served curled like shells); see scallop.

Examples

  • When buying veal for scaloppine, look for a nicely trimmed piece of top round, then slice it yourself across the grain to ensure the scaloppine will be the most tender.

    How To Cook Italian

  • A scaloppine is a cutlet sliced almost in half lengthwise and then opened, like the wings of a butterfly or a thin slice from a large roaster breast.

    The Perdue Chicken Cookbook

  • A scaloppine is a cutlet sliced in half lengthwise.

    The Perdue Chicken Cookbook

  • Rachel went for a rather exotically sounding dish called scaloppine al limone, described as chicken breast with creamed white wine and lemon, served with veg or chips.

    Shropshire Star

  • Stephanie Izard: veal scaloppine with tapenade and poached egg

    Top Chef All Stars Ep. 13: ZZZZZZZzzzzzzz

  • Saltimbocca, which literally means “jump into the mouth” in Italian, is a no-brag-just-facts description of the wonderfulness of the classic recipe made with veal scaloppine, prosciutto, and sage.

    SARA MOULTON’S EVERYDAY FAMILY DINNERS

  • • Pound chicken breasts thin enough for chicken piccata, or pieces of veal into cutlets for scaloppine.

    The City Cook

  • This tomato mixture also works well on top of chicken or veal scaloppine.

    Don't Fill Up on the Antipasto

  • We both had veal as our main course - my veal scaloppine marsala had several kinds of mushrooms and shaved black truffles.

    Archive 2008-12-01

  • One of the more popular cooking demonstrations has been "Thanksgiving Unstuffed," where chefs "take the traditional ingredients and prepare them in untraditional ways," such as pumpkin and butternut squash soup, grilled pear compote, cranberry sparklers, pumpkin mousse napoleon, and turkey medallions scaloppine style, says Jon Benson, director of culinary operations.

    Wining and Dining

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