Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A small weekly sum paid in school for tuition.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We cannot but fear also lest the remission of school-pence should be another step towards the destruction of Voluntary Schools.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • It has been, we believe, the invariable practice to insert into these new schemes the condition of school-pence; the portion of the endowment so saved has been applied to the foundation of exhibitions and other methods of assisting deserving children.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • A much less objectionable proposal was speedily made, namely, that the deficiency created by the remission of school-pence should be supplied by a Parliamentary grant.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • The amount of income arising from school-pence, it may be worth while noting, was 1,734,115l., or nearly two millions.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • The children brought their school-pence weekly, on Friday mornings; but, of course, their pence did not pay -- scarcely even began to pay -- for the cost.

    Major Vigoureux

  • It is evident that the proposal is so regarded; and though it may not be difficult to find arguments to show, that if the loss from school-pence be made up from the Exchequer, the compensation will work equally and fairly with respect to all schools, whether Voluntary or Board, still there can be little doubt that the additional grant will give a handle for proposing to introduce some more direct interference with the management of

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • Already arrangements are made by law for the payment of fees for very poor parents who make the proper application; and if there be any obstacle in the way of the smooth working of the law, the matter should be looked into and the law amended; but the great difficulty in the way of good attendance on the part of very poor children lies, as we apprehend, not more with school-pence, than with school-clothes, and school-dinners.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

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