Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A shield-bearer; one who bears the shield of his master; a sort of squire; also, a person entitled to a shield (that is, to armorial bearing).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Linked with this problem of classification is one of nomenclature -- the use of the terms "vallettus" and "esquier" (or, the Latin equivalents of the latter, "armiger" and "scutifer").

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • From a study of the records of the "esquiers" of 1368 (the group to which in that year Chaucer belonged) we learn further conditions under which the terms "vallettus" and "armiger" or "scutifer" are used.

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • In nearly all cases these esquires in the early years of their career, are called "vallettus," after some years of service they are occasionally called "armiger," and finally after the passage of more years are always called "armiger" or "scutifer."

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • In nearly all cases these esquires in the early years of their career, are called “vallettus,” after some years of service they are occasionally called “armiger,” and finally after the passage of more years are always called “armiger” or “scutifer.”

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • Edward III he is called “vallettus,” in 36 Edward III, he appears once as “scutifer,” and twice as “vallettus”; in 37 Edward III he is once named “vallettus”; in 38 Edward III he is called once “scutifer” and another time “vallettus”; in 41 Edward III he is mentioned twice as

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • It seems rather more likely that his proper position was that of “vallettus hospicii Regis” [Footnote: The household books, published in the Chaucer Records, recognize no such classification as “vallettus hospicii Regis,” pet the records certainly point to the existence of such a classification.] and later of course, “armiger” or “scutifer.”

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • In 15 Richard II ten pounds were given to Henry Scoggan, scutifer, at Nottingham.

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • From a study of the records of the “esquiers” of 1368 (the group to which in that year Chaucer belonged) we learn further conditions under which the terms “vallettus” and “armiger” or “scutifer” are used.

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • From this and the other cases in the list of esquires, it is clear that the term “esquier” (the equivalent of scutifer and armiger) indicates a rank above that of “vallettus.”

    Chaucer's Official Life

  • In 14, 15 and 16 Richard II, Robert de Bukton, scutifer of Thomas de Percy, is frequently mentioned in the Issue Roll as transmitting money from the Exchequer to de Percy,

    Chaucer's Official Life

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