Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small tropical American tree (Coccolobis uvifera) growing on sandy beaches and having large, glossy, leathery, rounded leaves and hard purplish fruit arranged in grapelike clusters.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small tree, Coccolobis uvifera, that grows on sandy beaches in tropical America; it has clusters of purple fruit
  • n. The gulf weed.
  • n. The clusters of gelatinous egg capsules of a squid (Loligo).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The gulf weed. See under gulf.
  • A shrubby plant (Coccoloba uvifera) growing on the sandy shores of tropical America, somewhat resembling the grapevine.
  • The clusters of gelatinous egg capsules of a squid (Loligo).

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See grape.
  • n. The grape-tree or seaside grape, Coccoloba uvifera. See grape-tree.
  • n. A glasswort, Salicornia herbacea.
  • n. 4. plural The clustered egg-cases of squids, cuttles, and other cephalopods. Sometimes they are numerous enough to choke the dredges and interfere with oystering.
  • n. The salt-grape (which see, under grape).

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  • I saw sea grapes for the first time a couple of years ago on the shore at a beach in Punta Cana.

    June 26, 2009

  • It's from issue 17.04 on p. 24.

    June 26, 2009

  • 17th of April, 2024? I'm slow.

    April 30, 2009

  • "Pet name for the newly discovered Gromia sphaerica." --"Jargon Watch," Wired (17.04, 24)

    April 30, 2009

  • "Sea grapes and mangroves tangled the shoreline, where white sand sloped toward a green-blue ocean."
    —Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague (New York: Berkeley Books, 2006), 127

    October 6, 2008