Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A marine annelid; a free errant worm of salt water, as distinguished from a sedentary or a terrestrial worm; a nereid. The species are very numerous, and the name has no specific application.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The colorful ones kinda remind me of the sea-worm things that Ursula turned the mermaids into in The Little Mermaid.

    They're Coming to Take Me Away, Ha Haa!

  • She turned back the lapel of her stiff white jacket and showed him the exquisite sea-worm pin.

    Genesis Force

  • “Six garnet beads, a sea-worm pin, and a transit pass.”

    Genesis Force

  • The wood of the tree is spongy, and is used for building wharves, as it is impervious to the sea-worm.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 4, April, 1862 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • The ships themselves may soon be displaced or destroyed by the sea-worm, but the New England granite will prove a lasting monument to the folly and madness of the rebellion.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 4, April, 1862 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • It resists sea-worm (_Teredo navalis_), white ants (_Termes_), and action of climate, and consequently is specially valuable for work on the surface of or under ground, and generally for all purposes where an extra strong and durable wood is required.

    The Philippine Islands

  • It has all the good qualities of _Molave_, except resistance to sea-worm (in which respect it is the same as Teak), and may be as much relied on for duration under ground; for sleepers it equals _Molave_.

    The Philippine Islands

  • It stands the climate well when properly seasoned; is a wood of the first quality, and can be used for any purpose except those involving interment in the ground or exposure to ravages of sea-worm.

    The Philippine Islands

  • It is specially used for sea piling and all kinds of marine work which is subject to the attacks of sea-worm (_Teredo navalis_).

    The Philippine Islands

  • It is proof against sea-worm, is used for salt or fresh water piling, piers, wharves, etc.; also for keels and many other parts of ship-building, and where a first-class wood is indispensably necessary.

    The Philippine Islands

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