self-preservative love

self-preservative

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to self-preservation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Even a libertarian society would have to have in place some mechanisms to encourage conformity, since no society exists without such a self-preservative mechanism.

    INTERVIEW: John C. Wright

  • Thus there are both desirable and undesirable societal passions and desirable and undesirable self-preservative passions.

    18th Century British Aesthetics

  • All self-preservative passions, by contrast, “turn” on pain, that is, each has either pain or its felt absence of pain as a constituent (Burke 1990, 37).

    18th Century British Aesthetics

  • Every self-preservative word that he had been meditating but an instant since dropped out of his memory.

    Armadale

  • Once the old virtues were refuted—the piety of the religious or the honor of the nobles—Hobbes and Locke assumed that most men would immediately agree that their self-preservative desires are real, that they come from within and take primacy over any other desire.

    THE CLOSING OF THE AMERICAN MIND

  • This is only a small mo-ment in the play, and it is one that Shakespeare may have decided to excise when he rewrote the play or cut it for performance, but it does suggest that some ordinary people are revolted by iniquity and are willing to act against narrowly self-preservative instincts in the name of compassion and pity.

    Shakespeare

  • Seidenberg's interpretation explains everything except what needs most to be explained, namely why the housewife's "salutary and self-preservative" neurosis took the form of the particular symptom in question, agora-phobia.

    An Exchange on Freud and Women

  • Geoffrey had been neither surprised nor protesting, but a strong self-preservative sense was keeping him quiet while he husbanded all the strength he possessed.

    The Tiger in the Smoke

  • Old instincts and movements that were once self-preservative and of serious meaning to a wild ancestor reappear in the play of children, and, utilized wisely, may under new form become a valuable possession of the adult.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • The practical utility of the first two is apparent; they are the most essential features of the group of so-called self-preservative instincts, among which may be grouped the natural tendency to recover one's equilibrium and the instinct of flight in the face of dangerous or threatening objects.

    Human Traits and their Social Significance

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