self-reproachful love

self-reproachful

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then, with a self-reproachful heart, I went around the small fire-hole, and caught up my cloak and other matters.

    The Night Land

  • Has any man a self-reproachful thought associated with pills, or ointment?

    Reprinted Pieces

  • Restless and self-reproachful as he was, he could not resist a smile as he thought of the terrifying oath of compact, sealed by a kiss upon the stones of a Pagan temple.

    A Changed Man

  • With an irresistible sense that something was wrong, – with a flashing self-reproachful fear that fatal mischief had come of my leaving the man there, and causing no one to be sent to overlook or correct what he did, – I descended the notched path with all the speed I could make.

    The Signal-Man by Charles Dickens | Solar Flare: Science Fiction News

  • I was getting, in my quiet way, rather sedulous and self-reproachful about you.

    Erema

  • Maud was quite incapable of understanding this self-pity, and seating herself at the little table by the window, she indulged her own self-reproachful thoughts on her conduct of the morning.

    Hayslope Grange A Tale of the Civil War

  • Perhaps she would have felt rather less self-reproachful if she had known the long hours of persuasion and argument by which Roger had at last prevailed upon his mother to refrain from pouring out the vials of her wrath on Nan's devoted head.

    The Moon out of Reach

  • Bluebell, struggling for composure, tried to speak, but the effort only precipitated an irrepressible flood of tears, and Du Meresq, grieved and self-reproachful, in his attempts to console her, used the fatal words that Lola afterwards repeated to Cecil.

    Bluebell A Novel

  • With this latter sect the political or other liking for the South was a much stronger and more active feeling than the humanitarian or other dislike of slavery; the first feeling, indeed, soon developed into a passion, the second into a self-reproachful obstruction.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 100, February, 1866

  • She told him in low, self-reproachful tones, and winced again as a movement of the injured arm brought agony.

    Colorado Jim

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