Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of crooked sword or hanger.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of crooked sword or hanger.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See shable.

Etymologies

Compare Dutch sabel. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If there were free lands which the peasant could cultivate if he pleased, would he pay £50 to some "shabble of a Duke" [2] for condescending to sell him a scrap?

    The Conquest of Bread

  • But when the gigantic Highlander advanced upon the worthy magistrate of Glasgow, after trying in vain once or twice to draw his father's _shabble_, as he called it, from its sheath, -- a weapon which had last seen the light at Bothwell Bridge, -- the Bailie seized as a substitute the red-hot coulter of a plough, which had been sticking in the fire.

    Red Cap Tales Stolen from the Treasure Chest of the Wizard of the North

  • I think it suld hae set the shabble that my father the deacon

    Rob Roy

  • -- I am a peacefu 'man and a magistrate, but if ony ane had guided sae muckle as my servant quean, Mattie, as it's like they guided Rob's wife, I think it suld hae set the shabble* that my father the deacon had at Bothwell brig a-walking again.

    Rob Roy — Complete

  • As he saw the gigantic Highlander confront him with his weapon drawn, he tugged for a second or two at the hilt of his _shabble, _ as he called it; but finding it loth to quit the sheath, to which it had long been secured by rust and disuse, he seized, as a substitute, on the red-hot coulter of

    Rob Roy — Complete

  • [208] Their sword or short shabble yet remains, and may now be seen in the hands of the publisher of this collection.

    Biographia Scoticana (Scots Worthies) A Brief Historical Account of the Lives, Characters, and Memorable Transactions of the Most Eminent Scots Worthies

  • As he saw the gigantic Highlander confront him with his weapon drawn, he tugged for a second or two at the hilt of his shabble, as he called it; but finding it loth to quit the sheath, to which it had long been secured by rust and disuse, he seized, as a substitute, on the red-hot coulter of a plough which had been employed in arranging the fire by way of a poker, and brandished it with such effect, that at the first pass he set the

    Rob Roy

  • Solomon’s wad have taught him that there was danger in edge-tools, and that he wad have bidden the smaik either sheath his shabble, or stand farther back.”

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • I think less wisdom than Solomon's wad have taught him that there was danger in edge-tools, and that he wad have bidden the smaik either sheath his shabble, or stand farther back. "

    The Fortunes of Nigel

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.