Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • No test has been applied for the claimed siderial diurnal period or for the correlation with the value of financial securities.

    Who Held the Grand Mosque Hostage?

  • The totality of the minute, simple world of the humans, microscopic and negligible as it was in the siderial universe, was as far beyond his guessing as is the siderial universe beyond the starriest guesses and most abysmal imaginings of man.

    Chapter 24

  • As though the thought had occurred to them simultaneously, they turned one to the other, and their lips met, their souls met, mingling in one dream; whilst above in the windless heaven space answered space with flashes of siderial light, and Canopus shone and burned like the pointed sword of Azrael.

    The Blue Lagoon: a romance

  • The progress of the moon through its complete series of stations is accomplished in a siderial month -- that is, twenty-seven days eight hours, but from the nature of the case it cannot be said that these "stations" are brought out each in his season, in that time, as a month makes but a small change in the aspect of the sky.

    The Astronomy of the Bible An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

  • They apparently ended in dust that whirled away in the vast abyss of siderial space, blown by the winds upon which suns and systems drift as autumn leaves.

    Time and Change

  • She looked at the small siderial clock, and finding that a quarter of an hour must elapse before she could make the desired observation, drew a chair to the table and seated herself.

    Macaria; or, Altars of Sacrifice

  • [665] Thomas Kerigan wrote _The Young Navigator's Guide to the siderial and planetary parts of Nautical Astronomy_ (London, 1821, second edition 1828),

    A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II)

  • [790] The _siderial_ day is about four minutes short of the solar; there are 366 sidereal days in the year.

    A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II)

  • The hurried nature of our journey would not allow me to do more; and it will be remembered that my observations were all siderial, by reason that the sextant would not embrace the sun in his almost vertical position at noon.

    Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia — Complete

  • Man has no wings, and yet he can soar above the clouds; he is not swift of foot, and yet he can out-speed the fleetest hound or horse; he has but feeble weapons in his organization, and yet he can slay or master all the great beasts; his eye is not so sharp as that of the eagle or the vulture, and yet he can see into the farthest depths of siderial space; he has only very feeble occult powers of communication with his fellows, and yet he can talk around the world and send his voice across mountains and deserts; his hands are weak things beside a lion's paw or an elephant's trunk, and yet he can move mountains and stay rivers and set bounds to the wildest seas.

    Time and Change

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