Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Next it gives a definition of the related terms suppositio and copulatio, and the differences between the terms significatio, suppositio and copulatio.

    Peter of Spain

  • From this definition and the example just presented it appears that the extensional features of significatio and suppositio naturalis overlap.

    Peter of Spain

  • There is a more telling difference between significatio and suppositio naturalis, however.

    Peter of Spain

  • Suppositio is dependent on significatio, because supposition can only occur via a term that already has some significatio.

    Peter of Spain

  • The link between significatio and suppositio is the following.

    Peter of Spain

  • The primary semantic property of a word is its significatio, in Peter's definition, the "representation of a thing by a word in accordance with convention".

    Peter of Spain

  • The significatio of a word depends on its imposition, i.e., the application originally given to the word in question.

    Peter of Spain

  • The counterpart of significatio, the formal constituent of every meaning, is the word's capacity to "stand for" different things

    Peter of Spain

  • The distinction between significatio and suppositio naturalis persisted throughout the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.

    Peter of Spain

  • When some word has acquired a signification by an impositor (= someone who bestows a meaning upon a word), then it connotes a univeral nature or essence, and acquires a natural capacity to stand for all the actual and possible individuals that share in this common nature; it owes this capacity to its significatio.

    Peter of Spain

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