Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having only one eye; cyclopean; monoculous; one-eyed, as the Cyclops Polyphemus figuring in Homer's Odyssey, or as various animals. See Cyclops, Monoculus.
  • Having the eye single or sound; earnest; devoted; unselfish. Compare single, adjective, 8.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I'm thinking, as I ponder the wisdom of Ursula LeGuin, that American culture is at the end of what it can accomplish with its single-eyed vision.

    Robert Koehler: Single-Eyed Vision

  • For the figure of the ungainly foe would stride across the delicious vision, huge against the waves like Cyclops, and like him gesticulant, but unhappily not so single-eyed that the slippery fair might despise him.

    Springhaven

  • But surely June, the warm, the single-eyed, would never tell Jon anything that might stop him being useful to her Rafaelite.

    Swan Song

  • Next to it was a dull-surfaced, single-eyed creature that resembled a tank-tracked millipede.

    The Mocking Program

  • Quickly he shifted his single-eyed gaze back and forth, taking in the beach and shoreline to the side.

    Conan the Indomitable

  • Baibars's single-eyed gaze paused for an instant, Daoud saw, as it fell upon each of the emirs.

    The Saracen: Land of the Infidel

  • Families have thus caught the emigrating spirit in sufficient numbers to form clans of pioneer evangelists, and torn themselves out of little Edens to found colonies in dreary moral deserts; and as "the kingdom comes" with more rapid strides such single-eyed emigrations will become more frequent.

    Elizabeth: the Disinherited Daughter By E. Ben Ez-er

  • -- But let me ask -- not the doctor here, whom I respect for his immense learning and Cyclopsian (I mean large -- not single-eyed) wisdom -- what _his_ remedy would be?

    A Strange Discovery

  • Abolitionism, Communism, every other fever that threatened to destroy the commercial status of the world, and substitute a single-eyed regard for human rights.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 103, May, 1866

  • Of all the men who have built up great States, I do believe there is not one whose alacrity of sound sense and single-eyed beneficence of aim could be more safely trusted than Franklin to draw light from the clouds and pierce the economic and political confusions of our time.

    His Address at Pittsburg

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