Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. large and economically important family of herbs or shrubs or trees often strongly scented and sometimes narcotic or poisonous; includes the genera Solanum, Atropa, Brugmansia, Capsicum, Datura, Hyoscyamus, Lycopersicon, Nicotiana, Petunia, Physalis, and Solandra

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I love the solanaceae family, not only because the members of its clan have the coolest names in the botanical world (datura and deadly nightshade - the belladonna genus is the deadliest of the bunch with high levels of alkaloids) but because the plants that are edible produce either fruit (like capsicums, aubergines and tomatoes) or berries (such as wolfberry) - and you know of my looooooooovvvve for aubergines.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • Despite the variety, selecting aubergine isn't brain science, so there is no reason to not enjoy this delectable member of the solanaceae family along with tomatillo, tomato, and gooseberry, to name a few.

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • Then taking out a short wooden pipe, he filled it with the coarse and bitter tobacco of Brazil, of which the leaves belong to that old “petun” introduced into France by Nicot, to whom we owe the popularization of the most productive and widespread of the solanaceae.

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • Then taking out a short wooden pipe, he filled it with the coarse and bitter tobacco of Brazil, of which the leaves belong to that old _ "petun" _ introduced into France by Nicot, to whom we owe the popularization of the most productive and widespread of the solanaceae.

    Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon

  • A member of the solanaceae family, the ground-cherry is edible and closely related to the tomato and tomatillo, but - and this is the best part - it tastes like tropical perfection, a mix of pineapple, passion fruit and cherry.

    SFGate: Top News Stories

  • Of course they fancy many of the solanaceae -- tomatoes, tobacco, eggplant, and potatoes, too, though I have never seen them on any spud plants in my realm.

    food museum blog

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