Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Pertaining to or involving any solecism.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Solecistical.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to or involving a solecism; incorrect; incongruous.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This uses a solecistic which in a restrictive clause!

    Up from out of in under for

  • There is the suggestion of psychological chaos in the solecistic, seemingly reckless, placement of her body in the decrepit spaces she favored, but aesthetically, the images are far from chaotic.

    Larissa Archer: Artist Unbound: Francesca Woodman at SFMOMA

  • From Alexander the grammarian, to refrain from fault-finding, and not in a reproachful way to chide those who uttered any barbarous or solecistic or strange-sounding expression; but dexterously to introduce the very expression which ought to have been used, and in the way of answer or giving confirmation, or joining in an inquiry about the thing itself, not about the word, or by some other fit suggestion.

    The Meditations

  • The near homophone for which you apparently reached is solecistic, violating conventional grammar.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • It seems to me that your mistaken solons are solecistic rather than solipsistic.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • It makes you solecistic and sort of self-enclosed without being successfully introspective.

    American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America

  • The k before e, or any letter except a, is solecistic, just as in no. 831 is the c, instead of k, for calendas.

    The Roman Pronunciation of Latin Why we use it and how to use it

  • From Alexander, the grammarian, to refrain from fault-finding, and not in a reproachful way to chide those who uttered any barbarous or solecistic or strange-sounding expression; but dexterously to introduce the very expression which ought to have been used, and in the way of answer or giving confirmation, or joining in an inquiry about the thing itself, not about the word, or by some other fit suggestion.

    I

  • From Alexander [167] the grammarian, to refrain from fault-finding, and not in a reproachful way to chide those who uttered any barbarous or solecistic or strange-sounding expression; but dexterously to introduce the very expression which ought to have been used, and in the way of answer or giving confirmation, or joining in an inquiry about the thing itself, not about the word, or by some other fit suggestion.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume II (of X) - Rome

  • From Alexander [B] the grammarian, to refrain from fault-finding, and not in a reproachful way to chide those who uttered any barbarous or solecistic or strange-sounding expression; but dexterously to introduce the very expression which ought to have been used, and in the way of answer or giving confirmation, or joining in an inquiry about the thing itself, not about the word, or by some other fit suggestion.

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

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