Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Present participle of spoor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We hastily returned to camp, where, having breakfasted, I saddled up, and proceeded to take up the spoor of the largest bull elephant, accompanied by after-riders and three of the guides to assist in spooring.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 6

  • "I am spooring," said Clarence with simple dignity.

    The Swoop! or How Clarence Saved England A Tale of the Great Invasion

  • Rain had fallen towards the daybreak, and this fact, together with the nature of the soil, made spooring a very difficult business.

    Maiwa's Revenge

  • We soon found the spoor of an old bull elephant, which led us into a dense forest, where the ground was particularly unfavorable for spooring; we, however, threaded it out for a considerable distance, when it joined the spoor of other bulls.

    Forest & Frontiers

  • It would be a tedious business spooring the game afoot, after it had once been fired upon.

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • There were good reasons for fearing that the elephant they were spooring was a "rover."

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • They had not followed it more than a quarter of a mile, when they came upon another road of a similar kind, that crossed the one they were spooring upon.

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • The hunters, who were now warmed to their work, proposed to follow up the spoor; but Swartboy, who had enough of that "old rogue," declared that there would be not the slightest chance of again coming up with him without horses or dogs; and as they had neither, spooring him any farther would be quite useless.

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • The hunters, who were now warmed to their work, proposed to follow up the spoor; but Swartboy, who had had enough of that "old rogue," declared that there would be not the slightest chance of again coming up with him without horses or dogs; and as they had neither, spooring him any farther would be quite useless.

    The Bush Boys History and Adventures of a Cape Farmer and his Family

  • "family hotels" in the Euston Road portrayed to me in the crude but vivid imagery of the East when spooring boar in Southern Morocco with a native tracker who had been one of a troupe of Soosi jugglers earning good pay at a West-end music-hall, and I once overheard a young

    Pan-Islam

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