Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An orifice for the discharge of a liquid.
  • n. The spiracle or blowhole of a whale or other cetacean.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Even now, when the boats pulled upon this whale, and perilously drew over his swaying flukes, and the lances were darted into him, they were followed by steady jets from the new made wound, which kept continually playing, while the natural spout-hole in his head was only at intervals, however rapid, sending its affrighted moisture into the air.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Having already in various ways put before you his skull, spout-hole, jaw, teeth, tail, forehead, fins, and divers other parts, I shall now simply point out what is most interesting in the general bulk of his unobstructed bones.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Thus, the fore-ground is all raging commotion; but behind, in admirable artistic contrast, is the glassy level of a sea becalmed, the drooping unstarched sails of the powerless ship, and the inert mass of a dead whale, a conquered fortress, with the flag of capture lazily hanging from the inserted into his spout-hole.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • And now abating in his flurry, the whale once more rolled out into view! surging from side to side; spasmodically dilating and contracting his spout-hole, with sharp, cracking, agonized respirations.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • I knelt, watching — in fact, peering up the spout-hole to see what might happen.

    More Jonathan Papers

  • Torrents of blood poured from his spout-hole, accompanied by hoarse bellowings, as of some gigantic bull, but really caused by the labouring breath trying to pass through the clogged air passages.

    The Cruise of the Cachalot Round the World After Sperm Whales

  • The waif-pole was thrust upright into the dead whale's spout-hole; and the lantern hanging from its top, cast a troubled flickering glare upon the black, glossy back, and far out upon the midnight waves, which gently chafed the whale's broad flank, like soft surf upon a beach.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • It has been said that the whale only breathes through his spout-hole; if it could truthfully be added that his spouts are mixed with water, then

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • And now abating in his flurry, the whale once more rolled out into view; surging from side to side; spasmodically dilating and contracting his spout-hole, with sharp, cracking, agonized respirations.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • And if at such times you should think that you really perceived drops of moisture in the spout, how do you know that they are not merely condensed from its vapour; or how do you know that they are not those identical drops superficially lodged in the spout-hole fissure, which is countersunk into the summit of the whale's head?

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

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