Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. to squint

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To squint.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “What if a poor fat squinny rogue, a low-born fellow even as I am, whom you had baffled and made a laughing-stock, had come to me in my loneliness and sworn before God that if you honorable gentlemen would not keep your words, he the clown would?”

    Westward Ho!

  • So he came round to the door with the coal-black horse with eyes of fire, and off they went as fast as before, or perhaps a little faster, till they came to Dame Goody's cottage, where the squinny-eyed old fellow lifted her down and left her, thanking her civilly enough, and paying her more than she had ever been paid before for such service.

    English Fairy Tales

  • One night she was woke up at midnight, and when she went downstairs, she saw a strange squinny-eyed, little ugly old fellow, who asked her to come to his wife who was too ill to mind her baby.

    English Fairy Tales

  • As she was buying the things she wanted, who should she see but the squinny-eyed old fellow who had taken her on the coal-black horse.

    English Fairy Tales

  • Dame Goody saw that it had squinny eyes just like its father.

    English Fairy Tales

  • "What if a poor fat squinny rogue, a low-born fellow even as I am, whom you had baffled and made a laughing-stock, had come to me in my loneliness and sworn before God that if you honorable gentlemen would not keep your words, he the clown would?"

    Westward Ho!, or, the voyages and adventures of Sir Amyas Leigh, Knight, of Burrough, in the county of Devon, in the reign of her most glorious majesty Queen Elizabeth

  • Yours at Haughton are all very well, but the very largest would be squinny beside these. "

    Black, White and Gray A Story of Three Homes

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