Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • I wanted there to be a steeple-chase, degraded eggs standing in for water hazards, bits of endometrial lining subbing for jumps, and only those sperm that surmounted the obstacles qualifying for additional heats.

    Beth Kohl: A Piece of the Reproductive Puzzle

  • Abracadabra, and won the famous Guttlebury steeple-chase.

    The Book of Snobs

  • The fact is, he was going to pay his losses upon the last Manchester steeple-chase, and

    The Book of Snobs

  • Now Archie was known to be a great man in a yacht, cognizant of ropes, well up in booms and spars, very intimate with bolts, and one to whose hands a tiller came as naturally as did the saddle of a steeple-chase horse to the legs of his friend Doodles.

    The Claverings

  • The walls were wainscoted half-way up, the wainscot being covered with green baize, the remainder with a bright-patterned paper, on which hung three or four prints of dogs 'heads; Grimaldi winning the Aylesbury steeple-chase; Amy Robsart, the reigning Waverley beauty of the day; and Tom Crib, in a posture of defence, which did no credit to the science of that hero, if truly represented.

    Tom Brown's Schooldays

  • Second time Gilford and my old man started, was a rainy Sunday at Auteuil, in the Prix du Marat, a 4500 meter steeple-chase.

    The Short Stories

  • These proceeded from the young Romans vociferating to their friends to bestir themselves to procure places at the steeple-chase programmed for this 14th of March.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 62, No. 384, October 1847

  • American method, -- enter with about fifty others for a sort of sentimental steeple-chase, elbow or knock every other fellow out of the way in the running, work awfully hard to please the girl, and get in by half a length, if one wins at all.

    Lippincott's Magazine, August, 1885

  • The space over the mantelpiece was adorned by a splendid portrait by Vandyke, flanked irreverently on either side by a series of old sporting prints, representing the whole beginning, continuation, and end of a steeple-chase course, and which, it is melancholy to state, were far more highly appreciated by Sir John than the beautiful and valuable picture which they surrounded.

    Vera Nevill Or, Poor Wisdom's Chance

  • Vavasour, who regarded the approaching campaign in about the same light as a steeple-chase -- a delightful piece of excitement, with a spice of danger in it.

    Bluebell A Novel

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