Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The above stone-colour fit for use, is not three and a half cents per pound.

    Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets

  • The pattern was a series of quatrefoils painted in stone-colour on the wood, outlined black, and filled with green.

    Ely Cathedral

  • The bow-window below leads into a little parlour hung with a stone-colour Gothic paper and Jackson's Venetian prints, which I could never endure while they pretended, infamous as they are, to be after Titian, &c., but when I gave them this air of barbarous bas-reliefs, they succeeded to a miracle: it is impossible at first sight not to conclude that they contain the history of Attila or Tottila, done about the very aera.

    Letters of Horace Walpole 01

  • By dinner-time I succeeded in finishing the painting, giving the craft not only a coat of black from her rail down to the copper, with a white stripe or ribbon round the ornamental groove cut for that purpose in the covering-board, but also a coat of pale stone-colour all round the inside of her low bulwarks, as well as a touch of varnish on the teak and mahogany-fittings of the deck.

    For Treasure Bound

  • His body was of a deep dead brown, broadly marked with irregular stripes and rings of pale stone-colour; and he emitted a strong musky odour, which, even at our distance from him, was almost overpowering.

    For Treasure Bound

  • A couple of deal tables and two chairs were all the furniture the room contained, in addition to the cupboards, painted in stone-colour, which covered the walls.

    Delia Blanchflower

  • And its door you could see through the glass of into the hall, when its shutters were not thumb-screwed up over the panes, was painted a green that staggered the reason, and smelt even more strongly than the stone-colour.

    Somehow Good

  • Krakatoa, on the other hand, was resplendent with stone-colour, and smelt strongly of it.

    Somehow Good

  • The ground-colour, too, in the egg of _L. erythronotus_ has seldom, if ever, as much green in it, and has commonly more of the pale creamy or pinky stone-colour than in the case of _L. lahtora_.

    The Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds, Volume 1

  • The ground is a pale olive stone-colour, and they are very minutely freckled and mottled, most densely at the large end, with pale, very slightly reddish brown; the freckling is excessively minute and fine.

    The Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds, Volume 1

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