Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A pit or quarry where stones are dug.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was the band of the Benefit Club, which had mustered in all its glory — that is to say, in bright-blue scarfs and blue favours, and carrying its banner with the motto, “Let brotherly love continue,” encircling a picture of a stone-pit.

    Adam Bede

  • Kenkenes picked his way through the debris of sticks, stones, dust and cast-off water-skins, and serenely disregarding the stare of the laborers, went up to the edge of the stone-pit and watched the work with interest.

    The Yoke A Romance of the Days when the Lord Redeemed the Children of Israel from the Bondage of Egypt

  • "In the early years of this century, such a linen weaver, named Silas Marner, worked at his vocation, in a stone cottage that stood among the nutty hedgerows near the village of Raveloe, and not far from the edge of a deserted stone-pit."

    English: Composition and Literature

  • Peering down into the stone-pit, Dante then timidly proffers his request, only to be hotly reviled by Pope Nicholas III, who first mistakes his interlocutor for Pope Boniface, and confesses he was brought to this state by nepotism.

    The Book of the Epic

  • In the night they took Harrison's money and 'tumbled me down a stone-pit.'

    Historical Mysteries

  • They could have left him in the 'stone-pit:' he knew not who they were, and the longer they rode by daylight, with a hatless, handcuffed, and sorely wounded prisoner, his pockets overburdened with gold, the more risk of detection they ran.

    Historical Mysteries

  • Therefore, as soon as our Bob had descended into the gray stone-pit, in which his dear father must have breathed his last, I took good care to be out of sight, after observing that he sat down exactly as his father must have sat, except that his attitude, of course, was sad, and his face pale and reproachful.

    George Bowring - A Tale Of Cader Idris From "Slain By The Doones" By R. D. Blackmore

  • In the early years of this century, such a linen-weaver, named Silas Marner, worked at his vocation in a stone cottage that stood among the nutty hedgerows near the village of Raveloe, and not far from the edge of a deserted stone-pit.

    Silas Marner (1885)

  • Marner, worked at his vocation in a stone cottage that stood among the nutty hedgerows near the village of Raveloe, and not far from the edge of a deserted stone-pit.

    Silas Marner

  • It was found in the process of enlarging a stone-pit in the parish of Castle Bytham.

    Rambles of an Archaeologist Among Old Books and in Old Places Being Papers on Art, in Relation to Archaeology, Painting, Art-Decoration, and Art-Manufacture

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