Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A petrel; one of the birds of the family Procellariidæ, including the albatrosses, fulmars, etc., as well as those to which the name petrel is more commonly applied; specifically, the stormy petrel. See cut under petrel.
  • n. A bird that indicates or seems to foretell bad weather by its cries or other actions, as a storm-cock. Compare rain-bird.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A little ‘Ah!’ came from Ethelberta, like a note from a storm-bird at night.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • Our little brig pitched her bows two or three times under water like a storm-bird, and did not ground.

    Travels in Morocco

  • "Can you really settle down to a squire's life, a storm-bird like you?"

    A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows

  • I sat and slept on the helm when they went away from the North Cape, and when I awoke, now and then, the storm-bird flew round my legs.

    The Garden of Paradise

  • Our far-travelled storm-bird continues his long journey westwards, and his next resting-place is the Samoa Islands, which he recognises by their lofty volcanic cliffs, their tuff and lava, their beautiful woods and waterfalls, as much as 650 feet high, and surrounded by the most luxuriant vegetation.

    From Pole to Pole A Book for Young People

  • The wind sweeps Adapa into the waters, but, since this element is controlled by Adapa's father, -- the god Ea, -- Adapa succeeds in mastering the south wind, and, as we learn from the course of the narrative, in breaking the wings of the storm-bird.

    The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria

  • A little 'Ah!' came from Ethelberta, like a note from a storm-bird at night.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • Thou'lt have another shape than that which is thine, even that of a slave of Noorna bin Noorka, and say to her when she asketh thy business with her, "O my mistress, let the storm gather-in the storm-bird when it would surprise men."

    Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith

  • Noorna, 'O my mistress, let the storm gather-in the storm-bird when it would surprise men.'

    The Shaving of Shagpat; an Arabian entertainment — Complete

  • The storm-bird has swallowed up all the stars as if they were flies, and the poor old mountain is so grieved at it, that streams of tears are everywhere flowing over his stony cheeks.

    Homo Sum — Volume 04

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