Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the styloid and mastoid processes of the temporal bone.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the styloid and mastoid processes of the temporal bone.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In anatomy, common to the styloid process and the mastoid division of the temporal bone.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • On emerging from the stylomastoid foramen, the facial nerve runs forward in the substance of the parotid gland, crosses the external carotid artery, and divides behind the ramus of the mandible into branches, from which numerous offsets are distributed over the side of the head, face, and upper part of the neck, supplying the superficial muscles in these regions.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • Just before the facial nerve emerges from the stylomastoid foramen, it generally receives a twig from the auricular branch of the vagus.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • After its exit from the stylomastoid foramen, the facial nerve sends a twig to the glossopharyngeal, and communicates with the auricular branch of the vagus, with the great auricular nerve of the cervical plexus, with the auriculotemporal nerve in the parotid gland, and with the lesser occipital behind the ear; on the face with the terminal branches of the trigeminal, and in the neck with the cutaneous cervical nerve.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • It is at first directed lateralward between the cochlea and vestibule toward the medial wall of the tympanic cavity; it then bends suddenly backward and arches downward behind the tympanic cavity to the stylomastoid foramen.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • The Digastric Branch (ramus digastricus) arises close to the stylomastoid foramen, and divides into several filaments, which supply the posterior belly of the Digastricus; one of these filaments joins the glossopharyngeal nerve.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • The Chorda Tympani Nerve is given off from the facial as it passes downward behind the tympanic cavity, about 6 mm. from the stylomastoid foramen.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • At the bottom of the meatus, the facial nerve enters the facial canal, which it traverses to its termination at the stylomastoid foramen.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • It receive the stylomastoid vein, and some tributaries from the cranial surface of the auricula.

    VII. The Veins. 3b. The Veins of the Head and Neck

  • The caroticotympanic branch (ramus caroticotympanicus; tympanic branch) is small; it enters the tympanic cavity through a minute foramen in the carotid canal, and anastomoses with the anterior tympanic branch of the internal maxillary, and with the stylomastoid artery.

    VI. The Arteries. 3a. 4. The Internal Carotid Artery

  • —The facial nerve at its exit from the stylomastoid foramen is situated about 2.5 cm. from the surface, opposite the middle of the anterior border of the mastoid process; a horizontal line from this point to the ramus of the mandible overlies the stem of the nerve.

    XII. Surface Anatomy and Surface Markings. 2. Surface Markings of Special Regions of the Head and Neck

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