Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of understanding and mentally supplying a word or thought that has been implied but not expressed.
  • n. A word or thought supplied by subaudition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of understanding, or supplying, something not expressed.
  • n. That which is understood or supplied from that which is expressed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of understanding, or supplying, something not expressed; also, that which is so understood or supplied.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of understanding something not expressed; that which is understood or implied from that which is expressed; understood meaning.

Etymologies

Late Latin subaudītiō, subaudītiōn-, from subaudītus, past participle of subaudīre, to supply an omitted word : Latin sub-, sub- + Latin audīre, to hear; see au- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin subauditio ("the supplying of a word omitted"), from subaudire ("to supply a word omitted"), from sub ("under") + audire ("to hear"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • All authors can do, is to depict men out of their business — in their passions, loves, laughters, amusements, hatreds, and what not — and describe these as well as they can, taking the business part for granted, and leaving it as it were for subaudition.

    The Virginians

  • Richardson's conception is, that there is a _subaudition_ in all these expressions; and that the meaning is, by point and by point; by baron and by baron; by horse and by horse: _one and one_, as Chaucer writes; each

    Notes and Queries, Number 67, February 8, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • All authors can do, is to depict men out of their business -- in their passions, loves, laughters, amusements, hatreds, and what not -- and describe these as well as they can, taking the business part for granted, and leaving it as it were for subaudition.

    The Virginians

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