Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To agree; to be in harmony.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To agree; to be in harmony.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To agree; harmonize. Also spelled symphonise.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. play or sound together, in harmony

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cage had a way to symphonize everything into beauty.

    Link love: language (4)

  • If, however, he and his wife did not always symphonize, still, on the whole, they continued to work together amicably, for Mrs. Burton took considerable pains to accommodate herself to the peculiarities of her husband's temperament, and both were blessed with that invaluable oil for troubled waters -- the gift of humour.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • The Greek word for "agree" is _symphonize, _ and suggests a musical harmony where chords are tuned to the same key and struck by a master hand.

    George Müller of Bristol And His Witness to a Prayer-Hearing God

  • If two shall _accord_ {150} or _symphonize_ in what they ask, they have the promise of being heard.

    The Ministry of the Spirit

  • Everyone can at some level symphonize with the unfortunate end of tradition, especially when it wasn't even necessary.

    Latest Daily Headlines

  • If, however, he and his wife did not always symphonize, still, on the whole, they continued to work together amicably, for Mrs. Burton took considerable pains to accommodate herself to the peculiarities of her husband’s temperament, and both were blessed with that invaluable oil for troubled waters — the gift of humour.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • When Daniel Webster was a youth of eighteen, in college, he wrote to a friend these suggestive words: "I am fully persuaded that our happiness is much at our regulation, and that the 'Know thyself' of the Greek philosopher meant no more than rightly to attune and soften our appetites and passions till they should symphonize like the harp of

    The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 4, Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 4, April, 1886

  • If, however, he and his wife did not always symphonize, still, on the whole, they continued to work together amicably, for Mrs. Burton took considerable pains to accommodate herself to the peculiarities of her husband's temperament, and both were blessed with that invaluable oil for troubled waters ” the gift of humour.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

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