Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The chief man of a tithing; a headborough; one elected to preside over the tithing.
  • n. A peace officer; an underconstable.
  • n. A parish officer elected annually to preserve good order in the church during divine service, to make complaint of any disorderly conduct, and to enforce the observance of the Sabbath.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The chief man of a tithing; a headborough; one elected to preside over the tithing.
  • n. A peace officer; an under constable.
  • n. A parish officer elected annually to preserve good order in the church during divine service, to make complaint of any disorderly conduct, and to enforce the observance of the Sabbath.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In old English law, the chief man of a tithing: same as headborough.
  • n. In England, a peace-officer; an under-constable; in early New England hist., a town officer elected each year to exercise a general moral police (derived from the constabulary functions of the English tithing-man) in the town.

Etymologies

tithing +‎ -man (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "There's a witch girl naming other witches," said the tithingman.

    Heartfire

  • When someone was breaking the sumptuary laws, or using coarse language, or otherwise offending against the standards that helped them all stay pure, it was a tithingman who tried, peacefully, to persuade them to mend their ways without the need of dire remedies.

    Heartfire

  • And a man didn't last long as a tithingman in a New England town if he fancied himself to be possessed of some sort of personal authority.

    Heartfire

  • "That's proof of it right there," said the tithingman.

    Heartfire

  • When a couple quarreled, it was a tithingman who went to them to help them iron it out, or to separate them for a time if that was needed.

    Heartfire

  • It is safer to say little of the theological scheme of the Puritan ministers, lest the present writer be pronounced a Wanton Gospeller, and have no tithingman to take his part.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 71, September, 1863

  • [Illustration: The tithingman tickling the nodding lady]

    The Child's World Third Reader

  • Besides keeping the boys from playing and the grown people from going to sleep, the tithingman must turn the hourglass.

    The Child's World Third Reader

  • She was very much afraid of the tithingman, who sat on a high seat.

    The Child's World Third Reader

  • When the sand had all run through, the tithingman turned the glass over and the sand began to tell another hour.

    The Child's World Third Reader

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