Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.pl. High boots, having generally a band of some kind of light-colored leather around the upper part of the leg; riding boots.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They were, he observed: "Russians in top-boots, leather leggings and fur hats; wild-looking people from the most outlandish parts of that great uncivilised land."

    Hugh Muir's diary

  • When the allied forces marched out of Tientsin for Peking, to the triumphal strains of a U.S. Army band, Butler marveled at the variety of flapping banners and crisp uniforms on display—the French Zouaves in red and blue, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers with their five black ribbons hanging from their collars, the turbaned Sikhs, the Cossack cavalrymen in their white tunics and shiny black top-boots.

    Devil Dog

  • "You say you're Flashman?" says another - he was wearing a pith helmet and spectacles, and what looked like old cricket flannels tucked into his top-boots.

    Fiancée

  • Yonder, where that phaeton with the well-clipped pair of grays has stopped — standing at their heads now — is a Yorkshire groom, who has not been very long in these parts, and looks sorrowfully round for a companion pair of top-boots, which he may traverse the city half a year without meeting.

    American Notes for General Circulation

  • John Barry wore a short frock-coat, buttoned tightly at the waist, made of scarlet cloth, with buttons bearing the De Verneuil arms, white leather breeches, top-boots, a striped waistcoat, and a collar and cape of black velvet.

    Modeste Mignon

  • He looked very rosy and very stout, especially about the legs, which appeared to have been compressed into his top-boots with some difficulty.

    Master Humphrey's Clock

  • ‘A little white hat and a little sprig weskut and little knee cords and little top-boots and a little green coat with little bright buttons and a little welwet collar,’ replied Tony, with great readiness and no stops.

    Master Humphrey's Clock

  • Perhaps the housekeeper thought that in such a guise young Tony would look more like the angel at Islington than anything else of that name, or perhaps she was disconcerted to find her previously - conceived ideas disturbed, as angels are not commonly represented in top-boots and sprig waistcoats.

    Master Humphrey's Clock

  • He wore top-boots, understood cattle, fed his horses upon corn, and had a lively personal interest in malt.

    Miscellaneous Papers

  • The lion dressed his tiger very smartly — a short tunic-coat of iron-gray cloth, belted with patent leather, bright blue plush breeches, a red waistcoat, polished leather top-boots, a shiny hat with black lacing, and brass buttons with the arms of Soulas.

    Albert Savarus

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.