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Examples

  • And Major Pendennis longed to be off, and have a little pheasant-shooting at Stillbrook, and get rid of all annoyances and tracasseries of the village.

    The History of Pendennis

  • In a letter from Toul, given in one of their papers, is the following passage concerning the people of that district: “Dans la Révolution actuelle, ils ont résisté à toutes les séductions du bigotisme, aux persécutions, et aux tracasseries des ennemis de la Révolution.

    Paras. 250-274

  • “I can only account,” says Mr. Ellis, “for his petulance and unfounded complaints from one of two motives ” either he wishes by these means to keep alive an interest in Europe, and more especially in England, where he flatters himself he has a party; or his troubled mind finds an occupation in the tracasseries which his present conduct gives to the governor.

    The History of Napoleon Buonaparte

  • Watching the progress of events from behind the scenes, one could not but think that in respect to the occasional _tracasseries_ between the

    Experiences of a Dug-out, 1914-1918

  • COLONEL STUART'S arrival at Portsdown was a great boon to Lady Portmore, who was living in a sea of tracasseries and explanations; to all of which he graciously inclined his ear.

    The Semi-Attached Couple

  • Down, -- of the witticisms that were perpetrated, the anticipations of amusement and admiration, and of the tracasseries which Miss Grimley had not failed to occasion.

    The Two Guardians or, Home in This World

  • She would not reason nor notice where filial tact taught her that it was best to be ignorant; she charged all tracasseries on the Peruvian republic, and set herself simply to ameliorate each vexation as it arose, and divert attention from it without generalizing, even to herself, on the state of the family.

    Dynevor Terrace: or, the clue of life — Volume 1

  • I never was much more disgusted with any human production than with the eternal nonsense, and tracasseries, and emptiness, and ill humour, and vanity of that young person; but he has some talent, and is a man of honour, and has dispositions of amendment, in which he has been aided by a little subsequent experience, and may turn out well.

    Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 4 (of 6) With His Letters and Journals

  • The girl was put under the care of a governess, who plagued my heart out with her airs and tracasseries for three or four years; at the end of which time, as she turned out to be Lord Delacour's mistress in form, I was obliged -- in form -- to beg she would leave my house: and I put her pupil into better hands, I hope, at a celebrated academy for young ladies.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 03

  • The girl was put under the care of a governess, who plagued my heart out with her airs and tracasseries for three or four years; at the end of which time, as she turned out to be Lord Delacour's mistress in form, I was obliged – in form – to beg she would leave my house: and I put her pupil into better hands, I hope, at a celebrated academy for young ladies.

    Belinda

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