Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Characterized by or tending to use tricks or trickery.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Who uses tricks or trickery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Given to tricks; artful in making bargains; given to deception and cheating; knavish.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Given to or characterized by trickery; deceitful; artful.
  • Synonyms Deceptive, roguish. See cunning.

Etymologies

trick +‎ -ish (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Gathering his slight person together, P. Sybarite crouched, quivered, jumped for glory and the Saints -- and all but brained himself on that impish and trickish grating.

    The Day of Days An Extravaganza

  • However, the news from Una was precious, for it was the first intelligence we had had since we left the dear child in bed in Rome, with that trickish fever playing about her.

    Memories of Hawthorne

  • Here was the genuine article – no, not the genuine article at all, we must go to Africa for that – but the sort of creatures generations of slavery have made them: obsequious, trickish, lazy and ignorant, yet kind-hearted, merry-tempered, quick to feel and accept the least token of the brotherly love which is slowly teaching the white hand to grasp the black, in this great struggle for the liberty of both the races.

    Hospital Sketches

  • Here was the genuine article -- no, not the genuine article at all, we must go to Africa for that -- but the sort of creatures generations of slavery have made them: obsequious, trickish, lazy and ignorant, yet kind-hearted, merry-tempered, quick to feel and accept the least token of the brotherly love which is slowly teaching the white hand to grasp the black, in this great struggle for the liberty of both the races.

    Hospital Sketches

  • There was a dignity in Jane's manner, that, with the spirit of the reply, taught Mrs. Wilson that she had, in her niece, a very different subject to deal with from her own wilful and trickish children.

    A New England tale, and Miscellanies

  • Mrs. Wilson, without having the pride of her nature at all subdued, became artful and trickish; she was sordid and ostentatious; a careful fellow-worker with her husband in the acquisition of their property, she secured to herself all the power and reputation of its outlay.

    A New England tale, and Miscellanies

  • While the malevolent, the trickish, and the grossly sensual, give notice of what they are by the cast of their features, and put their fellow-creatures upon their guard, that they may not be made the prey of these vices.

    Thoughts on Man: His Nature, Productions, and Discoveries

  • Even the chivalrous Harry the Eighth could not escape the trickish spirit of the age.

    The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic — Volume 3

  • But, however we may now regard it, it was in perfect accordance with the trickish spirit of the age; and the French king resigned all right of rebuking his antagonist on this score, when he condescended to become a party with him to the infamous partition treaty, and still more when he so grossly violated it.

    The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic — Volume 3

  • They call it the Fourberia della Scena, The Knavery or trickish Part of the Drama.

    Spectator, April 18, 1711

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