Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The captain of a Greek trireme.
  • n. An Athenian who outfitted and maintained a trireme as a part of his civic duties.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The captain of a trireme.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The commander of a trireme.
  • n. At Athens, one who (singly, or jointly with other citizens) had to fit out a trireme for the public service.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek antiquity, the commander of a trireme; also, a property-holder who was obliged to build ships and equip them at his own expense, as a public liturgy.

Etymologies

Latin triērarchus, from Greek triērarkhos : triērēs, trireme; see trei- in Indo-European roots + arkhos, ruler; see -arch.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Each trireme had a captain in Athens called the trierarch, who was usually a wealthy man and sometimes a mere figurehead.

    The Battle of Salamis

  • A "trierarch" oversaw the ship and funded the voyage.

    Epic Struggle: Fans Fight to Revive an Oar-Powered Greek Warship

  • The captain, or "trierarch," commanded implicit obedience.

    A History of Sea Power

  • "He is the Steinbrenner of the deal," says Mr. Hirschler, who notes that in ancient times, the trierarch would seek to poach better rowers through an active free-agent system.

    Epic Struggle: Fans Fight to Revive an Oar-Powered Greek Warship

  • Further still, supposing the allies had not to resort to Athens for the hearing of cases, only the official representative of the imperial state would be held in honour, such as the general, or trierarch, or ambassador.

    The Polity of the Athenians and the Lacedaemonians

  • Thrasybulus and Thrasyllus, one of whom was a trierarch and the other a private soldier, and to others who were thought to be the steadiest opponents of the oligarchical movement.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • On the other hand, she of whom a coward was born or a worthless man, a bad trierarch or an unskilful pilot, should sit with shaven head, behind her sister who had borne a brave man.

    The Thesmophoriazusae

  • For I have been trierarch five times, and four times I have been in naval engagements, and have paid many extra taxes in war, and have furnished the other contributions no less than other citizens.

    The Orations of Lysias

  • Later it was permissible for anyone, appointed as a trierarch, to point out someone richer than himself and to ask to have him take his place with the condition that if the other preferred, he should exchange fortunes with him and continue his office of trierarch.

    The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1

  • On the other hand, she of whom a coward was born or a worthless man, a bad trierarch [620] or an unskilful pilot, should sit with shaven head, behind her sister who had borne a brave man.

    The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2

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