Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. A genus of humming birds. It Formerly included all the known species.
  • n. Any one of several species of wrens and kinglets.
  • n. The crocodile bird.
  • n. An annular molding whose section is concave, like the edge of a pulley; -- called also scotia.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A trochil; one of several different birds.
  • n. [capitalized] In ornithology, a Linnean genus of humming-birds, type of the family Trochilidæ, formerly including all the species then known, since divided into perhaps 200 modern genera.
  • n. In architecture, same as scotia.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some also are killed by means of a little bird called the trochilus, which, while seeking for some picking of small food, and flying gently about the beast while asleep, tickles its cheeks till it comes to the neighbourhood of its throat.

    The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus During the Reigns of the Emperors Constantius, Julian, Jovianus, Valentinian, and Valens

  • Since he has his living in the water he keeps his mouth all full within of leeches; and whereas all other birds and beasts fly from him, the trochilus is a creature which is at peace with him, seeing that from her he receives benefit; for the crocodile having come out of the water to the land and then having opened his mouth (this he is wont to do generally towards the West Wind), the trochilus upon that enters into his mouth and swallows down the leeches, and he being benefited is pleased and does no harm to the trochilus.

    An Account of Egypt: Being the Second Book of His Histories Called Euterpe. Paras. 20-39

  • Since he has his living in the water he keeps his mouth all full within of leeches; and whereas all other birds and beasts fly from him, the trochilus is a creature which is at peace with him, seeing that from her he receives benefit; for the crocodile having come out of the water to the land and then having opened his mouth (this he is wont to do generally towards the

    The history of Herodotus — Volume 1

  • Since he has his living in the water he keeps his mouth all full within of leeches; and whereas all other birds and beasts fly from him, the trochilus is a creature which is at peace with him, seeing that from her he receives benefit; for the crocodile having come out of the water to the land and then having opened his mouth (this he is wont to do generally towards the West

    An Account of Egypt

  • When the crocodile yawns, the trochilus flies into his mouth and cleans his teeth.

    The History of Animals

  • The trochilus gets his food thereby, and the crocodile gets ease and comfort; it makes no attempt to injure its little friend, but, when it wants it to go, it shakes its neck in warning, lest it should accidentally bite the bird.

    The History of Animals

  • Three of these parts constitute the torus at the top, and the other four are to be divided equally, one part constituting the upper trochilus with its astragals and overhang, the other left for the lower trochilus.

    The Ten Books on Architecture

  • The astragals must be one eighth of the trochilus.

    The Ten Books on Architecture

  • This benefits the crocodile, who is pleased, and takes care not to hurt the trochilus.

    Museum of Antiquity A Description of Ancient Life

  • The little trochilus builds its nest in the crocodile’s jaws.

    I. The Little Shoe. Book XI

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