Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To twang.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • v. To twang.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To twang lightly or frequently: said either of an instrument or of its player.
  • To cause to twangle.
  • n. A twangling sound; a twang or clang.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A pile of closed files was stacked to his left, and the junk-shop-recovered radio on a shelf across the room sung a treble-topped twangle of some piece or other of classical music.

    The Art Thief

  • When those "Spring's delights" of which you melodiously twangle are a leetle more _en évidence_.

    Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 102, March 26, 1892

  • Dan was not much in the humour for tunes, but he said, "Ay, Joe, give us a one, man-alive," and Joe struck up with twangle and squeak.

    Strangers at Lisconnel

  • To contend with this carnal orchestra, the religious world, having long ago rejected its Catholic Psalms as antiquated and unscientific, and finding its Puritan melodies sunk into faint jar and twangle from their native trumpet-tone, had nothing to oppose but the innocent, rather than religious, verses of the school recognised as that of the English

    The Crown of Wild Olive also Munera Pulveris; Pre-Raphaelitism; Aratra Pentelici; The Ethics of the Dust; Fiction, Fair and Foul; The Elements of Drawing

  • That the martial clangour of a trumpet had something in it vastly more grand, heroic, and sublime than the twingle-twangle of

    The Letters of Robert Burns

  • The King looked after him, with some wonder at this want of breeding, which, however, he imputed to his visitor’s insular education, and then again began to twangle his viol.

    Anne of Geierstein

  • An old Indian merchant, or some such thing, seemed to me a better character — the Spaniard did nothing but stalk about and twangle his guitar, for the amusement of my Lady Binks, as I think.”

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • - for the sake of one's ears, in mercy, stop that everlasting twangle of your old fiddle!

    Rob of the bowl : a legend of St. Inigoe's,

  • That the martial clangour of a trumpet had something in it vastly more grand, heroic, and sublime, than the twingle twangle of a jew's-harp: that the delicate flexure of a rose-twig, when the half-blown flower is heavy with the tears of the dawn, was infinitely more beautiful and elegant than the upright stub of a burdock; and that from something innate and independent of all associations of ideas; -- these I had set down as irrefragable, orthodox truths, until perusing your book shook my faith.

    The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. With a New Life of the Poet, and Notices, Critical and Biographical by Allan Cunningham

  • That the martial clangour of a trumpet had something in it vastly more grand, heroic, and sublime, than the twingle twangle of a Jews-harp; that the delicate flexure of a rose-twig, when the half-blown flower is heavy with the tears of the dawn, was infinitely more beautiful and elegant than the upright stub of a burdock; and that from something innate and independent of all associations of ideas; - these I had set down as irrefragable, orthodox truths, until perusing your book shook my faith.

    The Letters of Robert Burns

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